Meet Catherine:

Catherine

Catherine is still a new knitter, but she’s an avid crocheter and needle felter. In addition to fiber craft, she is an illustrator focusing on comics and religiously-inspired paintings. She describes herself as a gamer — she enjoys video games, Dungeons and Dragons, and Magic: The Gathering. She is a lover of fantasy and history. Both Mim and Catherine are dedicated members of the Society for Creative Anachronism, an international organization which researches and recreates the arts and skills of the Middle Ages and Renaissance periods, of which Catherine has been a member since birth!

Catherine has been working at Over the Rainbow Yarn since April of 2015.

Catherine’s Latest Blog Posts:


It's Been a While

I’ve been running back and forth between so many projects lately– for the store and personal work at home — that I’ve completely forgotten that I haven’t made a blog post about coloring page sketches in a while!  Lucky for you all, this means there’s plenty to take a peek at. Here are some past sketches, some possible future ones, and a tiny sprinkling of leftovers from lunch breaks (if you can spot them).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes an Experiment is in Order

When I knit something that will be felted later, I tend to prefer using a yarn I know will wet felt by hand very well. While I do love how much easier it is to throw things into the washer and dryer, I don’t get as much control over the shape the piece gets felted into as well as I would like. Since I knit a lot of dolls, I often use my hands to sculpt the wool as it felts. For this reason, I normally lean towards using yarns from Quince&Co.– particularly Lark and Chickadee. As I’ve been knitting and felting test swatches of all the feltable yarns around the store (an ever ongoing project of mine ), these ones have remained my favorites so far. 

There is one, however, that I wasn’t entirely sure would felt, and if so, how well: Tern. Some of you may be familiar with this Quince yarn. For those of you who aren’t, it’s a lovely fingering weight yarn made of wool, but it also includes a fair percentage of silk. I simply had to make a test swatch. The verdict?

Knit on US 0s

Tern absolutely felts, and much more than I thought it would. I’m sure if I had used a washer and dryer rather than some vigorous hand rubbing it would have felted more. 

Love, Thy Name is Double-Points

When I first came to work at the store almost two years ago, all I could knit was a garter stitch rectangle. I didn’t know how to increase or decrease, I could barely manage a purl, and the mere concept of knitting in the round baffled me. I would learn all of these things– and many more– over time, and found my confidence. Until a few months ago, however, there was still one area of the store I would glimpse at in terror:  the double pointed needles.  

After trudging through those few unsuccessful, unfinished projects to get the hang of them, I can now say that double pointed needles are my absolute favorite type to use, and I’m even more in love with using them to knit dolls. 

Need 6″ US 7s? I’ve got you covered. Maybe a little TOO covered.

I think I can safely say I have more projects started on double points that I need to finish than on any other needles. Here are a few that I’ve been able to finish!

If you’ve been reading since October (or maybe you’re a new reader that’s gone back through the archives) you may remember that for a while I was making little felted pumpkins out of Quince&Co. Lark and Osprey for Halloween decorations! These were my second finished double pointed projects, and I’m still thrilled with them. 

What was the first finished project you ask? Well, a little felted Bluebird of Happiness of course! It was a wonderful little project I could finish in a few hours, and on top of that I also got to learn how to wrap-and-turn. This little guy was made out of Quince&Co. Chickadee. See what I did there? I amuse myself. 

 

My most recent completed dolls were slightly modified versions of the Mushroom Sprite pattern. (Which are seriously super cute and you should make them.) The first one I made was out of Bartlett, and it truly was the best choice to get that rough, rustic feel I was going for. Not to mention, it smells wonderful!

His little brother, made of Malabrigo Rasta and Caracol (only one skein of each!!!), was requested by my fiancé. His name is Bindle. There was so much left over, I might have to make another one for myself!

 

Beautiful Buttons

I love buttons. They can be so unique and beautiful, and they can brighten up even the simplest of garments and accessories. I’ll even use them to embellish my needle felted dolls from time to time!

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Every now and then when I’m facing shelves I get to take a peek through our button racks, and I always seem to find something new and entertaining. Today I’d like to share a few of my favorites with you, and hopefully spark some inspiration! (Ignore my gross fingers)

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He’s so happy!

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Sometimes I like to use these and the antlers above in my felting.

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Each of these coconut shell buttons can be vastly different from the others in the tube.

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When you’re trying to find the perfect button, look no further. This is THE perfect button for everything, no doubt about it. Everything you have needs to portray the heartwarming story of the goat that lived on a farm and was best friends with a toad. ~*~Everything~*~


Read more on our collaborative blog page.